Light Moving Through Time premieres at Art Klub

Light Moving Through Time premieres at Art Klub

By Will Coviello

Posted February 12, 2018 • Gambit

 Doron Perk and percussionist Roy Yosef Timinaker perform  Light Moving Through Time .  Photo by Cheryl Gerber

Doron Perk and percussionist Roy Yosef Timinaker perform Light Moving Through Time.
Photo by Cheryl Gerber

A dance piece and photo book explore movement captured on film

Choreographer Meryl Murman's Ways of Forgetting had a successful run in Los Angeles in 2014, and she's halfway through making it into a feature film. The original piece had dancers play seven people trying to make personal connections in a society whose workings tend to leave people feeling lonely. The film combines the poetic abstract movement of the original piece with Murman's inspirations from graphic novels and martial arts.

While working on the film with cinematographer Nick Shamblott, they discovered something in still photos. As they examined screen grabs from the film, they noticed frozen moments of action, marked by photographic motion blur and captured poses by the dancers.

"We're used to seeing motion in a certain way, but the photos revealed this aspect of the motion or action that's lost to the human eye," Murman says. "From a choreographic perspective, there is all this labor that goes into a movement, but it's rendered invisible. To be able to trace that is fascinating — to trace the tempos of the body in motion."

Those photos became the inspiration for Light Moving Through Time, the name of a dance piece and a book of photos that debut Feb. 17 at Art Klub. The performance also includes choreographer Ann Glaviano's Known Mass: St. Maurice, a dance installation.

MediaReese Johanson
Meryl Murman
 Meryl Murman at home (Photo provided by: Meryl Murman)

Meryl Murman at home (Photo provided by: Meryl Murman)

Editor’s Note: Meryl Murman is presenting the work, The Aesthetics of Garbage–which  is an ongoing research laboratory for projects that scavenge, explore and reflect on discarded ideas. Curated by FLOCK and lasting the duration of Prospect 4, artists Ann Glaviano, Nick Shamblott, Caitlin Adams, Milo Daemgen, and Meryl Murman will engage with each other, collaborating artists and the public in critical conversations and experiments that respond to cultural artifacts, lost causes, abandoned plans, and forgotten ideas through various media. Opening night is Monday, November 26 and the show runs until February 17.

MediaReese Johanson
Derek Brueckner
 Courtesy of Derek Brueckener

Courtesy of Derek Brueckener

“Every beginning is cheerful; the threshold is the place of expectation,” Goethe once noted. At any given performance, audiences are typically good-natured and generous at the start, eager for their expectations to be met. Beginnings are easy. Then comes that certain moment in a piece when one feels the audience swing — whether into disappointment, delight, contemplation, or bewilderment. It happens in the bat of an eye. Derek Brueckner’s “Collaborative Studio” exploits and extends this moment at the threshold.

MediaReese Johanson